Compass Box - Asylas Deluxe Brand - Sweet & Delicate 70cl Bottle

Details

Compass Box - Asylas Deluxe Brand
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70cl Bottle
£33.20
In Stock
 

Description:
Type: Blended Scotch Whisky. A blend of Scotch grain whisky and malt whisky (50/50%).

Tasting Notes: Sweet, delicate and very smooth on the palate, with flavours of vanilla-cream, cereals, and sweet oakiness.

Lead Distilleries: Malt whiskies: Cragganmore, Linkwood, Glen Elgin. Grain whiskies: Cambus, Cameron Bridge.

Casks: 100% first-fill Bourbon barrels.

Bottling Details: 40%. Not chill filtered, natural colour.

John Glaser's Tasting Notes: 'Blended Scotch whiskies (that is, blends of grain whisky and malt whisky) are terribly misunderstood. Ours shows you why the 19th century whisky blenders started combining these two types of whisky to begin with: to create delicious, gulpable, elegant, lighter style whiskies for everyday drinking. The reason ours wins so many awards is that we do it right: blending soft and fruity malt whiskies on a bed of rich and sweet grain whiskies. It's really the quality of our grain whiskies that makes Asyla so special. There is no other blended Scotch whisky that uses grain whiskies of this quality. All whiskies from top notch American oak casks. Delicious. If you love whisky, this should be your house whisky.'

Asyla is our blend of grain and malt whisky. It's an elegant and approachable whisky that epitomizes the Compass Box house style of richness, sweetness and softness. It's a whisky made for casual drinking, before dinner, outdoors, in a cocktail, or however you like.
Before I started Compass Box, I was on a quest to find my perfect everyday "house" whisky. What I mean is, I wanted a whisky of the quality and flavour characteristics of the very best small production whisky bottlings (i.e, from great casks, no chill filtering, etc.), but in a style that's more conducive to drinking casually, glass after glass. Blended Scotch Whisky, combining malt whiskies and lighter, sweeter grain whiskies, is the perfect medium for this. Asyla, given its malty-fruitiness, its vanilla-sweetness and its softness on the palate, is this style. It's got the complexity and quality that will appeal to serious whisky fans, but also the approachability to intrigue new whisky drinkers, too.

Matthew Jukes, the well-known British wine and spirits writer--he gets it! I don't normally like to quote journalists at length, but what he said is right on: "Asyla is a whisky for all occasions. It is not a big, spicy, dark style, but a honeyed, heather, vanilla and white flower-style of whisky, with a touch of sweetness on the finish. You could drink it as an aperitif, it is so appealing and mellow. This is the ultimate crowd-pleasing, yet classy whisky... ."

Blending from individually selected casks without chill filtration is the way to make the kind of whisky I'm talking about here. The individual whiskies I've used to make Asyla were all of a quality that they each could have been bottled as singles; but that would be missing the point.
The name Asyla comes from the plural of the word "asylum." It's simply a word I like because of the various connotations it can have to the things we do that give texture and meaning to our lives. (I first encountered the word in an article about a piece of music written by Thomas Ad's, an award-winning young English musician who wrote an orchestral work called Asyla. Without being too ridiculously philosophical about a bottle of whisky, I just like the different associations the word can have--are we talking sanctuary? madhouse? A little of both? It's up to you.
As for the all-important questions about the whisky itself ... Asyla is a blend of some gorgeous, soft, rich malt whiskies, on a bed of delicious grain whiskies. All the whiskies, both malts and grains, are from first-fill American oak casks. I am very particular about the types of casks my whiskies age in, and I pick this type of cask for the additional richness, sweetness and vanilla characters they lend to the whiskies. Asyla is the only blended whisky we know of that comes from exclusively first-fill American oak barrels. This shows through in the style and in the quality of this whisky.
The grains (you'll notice that from here onward I'll refer to grain whiskies by their nickname as 'grains' and likewise malt whiskies as 'malts') come from the now-silent Cambus distillery and Cameronbridge in Fife. I say that grains create a 'bed' for the malt whisky because that's exactly what they do: they provide the soft, sweet, vanilla-and-toffee-rich foundation of this whisky, as grains should do for any good blend. Some inexpensive blended whiskies use grains as fillers, choosing young, immature whiskies from poor quality, overused casks. (Is it any wonder why grains and blends often have such a poor reputation?) I use grain whiskies for their flavour, their texture and their sweetness. You get grains with these characteristics by picking well-matured casks of top quality, "first fill" American oak.

The importance of grains cannot be overstated. What many people don't realise is that in really good whisky blends, it is the grains that provide the softness and the smoothness. The malts, while providing bigger flavours, actually have more pungency to them--most people would call this "bite". So to make a truly silky, soft whisky blend, you rely on extraordinary grain whiskies as the "bed" on which you lay the malt whiskies.
And you should be happy to know that Asyla, as with all my whiskies, will get slightly hazy when it gets cold or when you add water because I do no chill filter. Asyla is only rough filtered with a "guard" filter to keep large bits of wood from clogging the bottling equipment. No pad filters ever get in front of my whiskies! This approach gives you all of the complexity, mouthfeel and pureness of flavour of the component whiskies straight from the casks. You CAN tell the difference. Further, the colour of Asyla, like all Compass Box whiskies, is the natural colour of the whiskies. No spirit caramel is added. I know of no other blended whiskies made in this way.
By the way, Asyla won a Gold Medal for blended whisky at the 2003 International Wine & Spirit Festival!



Category(s):     Blended Malt Whisky

Producer: Compass Box Whisky Co   -   www.compassboxwhisky.com
ABV:   40%
Brand:   Compass Box Whisky Co
Country of Origin:   Scotland

Pricing

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70cl Bottle In Stock £ 33.20 Add to BasketAdd to WishList

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Producer Information

Compass Box is a company that exists to bring to people the joy and pleasure of drinking great whisky.
The company is founded on these principles by John Glaser:
"I believe that people need to feel deeply and passionately about what they do--about the products they create and sell. I believe that a business has an obligation to contribute to society by supporting the welfare of its community. I believe this obligation should be integrated into a company?s work. It should be part of the belief system of all the people who join the company.
I believe in experimentation and evolution--that businesses must constantly create, invent, try new things, jettison what no longer serves their purposes. Because the horizon is always moving. Yes, I believe that running a business in this day and age comes with certain obligations. Here are some of my thoughts ...
Business is the most powerful force in society today. Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield of Ben and Jerry's ice cream fame write an insightful piece on this topic in their book Ben and Jerry's Double Dip. Their thoughts have reinforced my views on the subject, and I thank them for that. They point out that in past centuries religion was the most powerful force in society, and with that status came the role and obligation of churches to promote the general welfare of society. Over time, this power and its associated obligations shifted to governments. But today, business has taken over as the most powerful force in society.
And with this role should come (I contend) the same obligation as churches and governments have had in the past: the obligation, as the most powerful societal force, to support the community and promote its general welfare. Community can be defined differently by different businesses, but I believe that at minimum it refers to the employees of the company, and the community where the company operates or where its business activity has the greatest impact.
So what can I do about this obligation as a tiny start-up company? From a strictly local perspective, I can support local suppliers for everything from office supplies to the printing of my whisky labels. From a broader perspective, I can do things that support sustainable environmental business practices, like sourcing paper for my labels and stationary that is made of unbleached fibres (versus paper from bleached fibres, whose production can pollute water sources with toxins). (And this is harder than it sounds, because these alternatives are often more costly, which is sometimes a difficult choice for a small business to make. I therefore believe it's even more incumbent on bigger businesses to try to make these decisions to help bring down overall costs of these alternatives.)
From a long term perspective, I hope that the sales of Compass Box whiskies, which draw on whiskies from distilleries all over Scotland, will support the livelihood of these distilleries and the jobs associated with them; many distilleries in Scotland (particularly those in remote regions with little else in the way of industry) are susceptible to closure through industry consolidation and rationalisation.
So what can I do about this obligation as a small business? From a strictly local perspective, I can support local suppliers for everything from office supplies to the printing of my whisky labels. From a broader and longer term perspective, I hope that the sales of Compass Box whiskies, which draw on whiskies from distilleries all over Scotland, will support the livelihood of these distilleries and the jobs associated with them; many distilleries in Scotland (particularly those in remote regions with little else in the way of industry) are susceptible to closure through industry consolidation and rationalisation. If Compass Box can play a part in helping generate greater demand for whisky in the world, these distilleries and their jobs are more secure.
Another thing we can do is to set aside a percentage of before tax profit every year to give back to the community in some form of support. As we're a small business, it's not a great deal of money, but it's something. An important something, I think."

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