Compass Box - Spice Tree - After Dinner Sipping 70cl Bottle

Details

Compass Box - Spice Tree
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70cl Bottle
£41.09
In Stock
 

Description:
It's back.

The Spice Tree is a very rich malt whisky, suitable for after dinner sipping, as an accompaniment to certain cheeses, and especially, in cocktails.

Big, sweet aromas of clove, ginger, cinnamon, nutmeg and vanilla.

The palate is full, round and sweet, with the spice and vanilla and complementing the core distillery characters and leaving a long finish.



Category(s):     Blended Malt Whisky

Producer: Compass Box Whisky Co   -   www.compassboxwhisky.com
ABV:   46%
Brand:   Compass Box Whisky Co
Country of Origin:   Scotland

Pricing

SizeAvailabilityPriceUnit PriceBuyDesire
70cl Bottle In Stock £ 41.09 Add to BasketAdd to WishList

Gift Packaging Options

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Compass Box - Oak CrossIn Stock   70cl Bottle£ 37.68
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Compass Box - Spice TreeIn Stock   70cl Bottle£ 41.09
Compass Box - The Peat MonsterIn Stock   70cl Bottle£ 40.40

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Producer Information

Compass Box is a company that exists to bring to people the joy and pleasure of drinking great whisky.
The company is founded on these principles by John Glaser:
"I believe that people need to feel deeply and passionately about what they do--about the products they create and sell. I believe that a business has an obligation to contribute to society by supporting the welfare of its community. I believe this obligation should be integrated into a company?s work. It should be part of the belief system of all the people who join the company.
I believe in experimentation and evolution--that businesses must constantly create, invent, try new things, jettison what no longer serves their purposes. Because the horizon is always moving. Yes, I believe that running a business in this day and age comes with certain obligations. Here are some of my thoughts ...
Business is the most powerful force in society today. Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield of Ben and Jerry's ice cream fame write an insightful piece on this topic in their book Ben and Jerry's Double Dip. Their thoughts have reinforced my views on the subject, and I thank them for that. They point out that in past centuries religion was the most powerful force in society, and with that status came the role and obligation of churches to promote the general welfare of society. Over time, this power and its associated obligations shifted to governments. But today, business has taken over as the most powerful force in society.
And with this role should come (I contend) the same obligation as churches and governments have had in the past: the obligation, as the most powerful societal force, to support the community and promote its general welfare. Community can be defined differently by different businesses, but I believe that at minimum it refers to the employees of the company, and the community where the company operates or where its business activity has the greatest impact.
So what can I do about this obligation as a tiny start-up company? From a strictly local perspective, I can support local suppliers for everything from office supplies to the printing of my whisky labels. From a broader perspective, I can do things that support sustainable environmental business practices, like sourcing paper for my labels and stationary that is made of unbleached fibres (versus paper from bleached fibres, whose production can pollute water sources with toxins). (And this is harder than it sounds, because these alternatives are often more costly, which is sometimes a difficult choice for a small business to make. I therefore believe it's even more incumbent on bigger businesses to try to make these decisions to help bring down overall costs of these alternatives.)
From a long term perspective, I hope that the sales of Compass Box whiskies, which draw on whiskies from distilleries all over Scotland, will support the livelihood of these distilleries and the jobs associated with them; many distilleries in Scotland (particularly those in remote regions with little else in the way of industry) are susceptible to closure through industry consolidation and rationalisation.
So what can I do about this obligation as a small business? From a strictly local perspective, I can support local suppliers for everything from office supplies to the printing of my whisky labels. From a broader and longer term perspective, I hope that the sales of Compass Box whiskies, which draw on whiskies from distilleries all over Scotland, will support the livelihood of these distilleries and the jobs associated with them; many distilleries in Scotland (particularly those in remote regions with little else in the way of industry) are susceptible to closure through industry consolidation and rationalisation. If Compass Box can play a part in helping generate greater demand for whisky in the world, these distilleries and their jobs are more secure.
Another thing we can do is to set aside a percentage of before tax profit every year to give back to the community in some form of support. As we're a small business, it's not a great deal of money, but it's something. An important something, I think."

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