Schneider - Aventinus - Wheat Beer 20x 500ml Bottles

Details

Schneider - Aventinus
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500ml Bottles
£3.87
In Stock
 

Description:
A wheat doppelbock with a dark-ruby colour, Aventinus has a compact and persistent head.

Very intense with a complex spicy chocolate-like aroma, on the palate you experience a complex soft touch, fresh with a hint of caramel. It finishes in a rich soft and lightly bitter impression.

Deep and complex - for big and relaxing moments by the fire.

The ideal companion for hearty roast meat, venison and also fruity chocolate desserts.

Oldest wheat doppelbock of Bavaria. Since 1907.



Category(s):     Wheat Beer

Producer: Schneider   -   www.schneider-weisse.de
ABV:   8.2%
Brand:   Schneider
Country of Origin:   Germany

Pricing

SizeAvailabilityPriceUnit PriceBuyDesire
20x 500ml Bottles In Stock £ 77.35 £ 3.87 Add to BasketAdd to WishList

3 Products From this Producer

ProductAvailabilitySizePrice
Schneider - AventinusIn Stock   20x 500ml Bottles£ 77.35
Schneider - GrunesIn Stock   20x 500ml Bottles£ 61.85
Schneider - OriginalIn Stock   20x 500ml Bottles£ 51.85

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Producer Information

The wheat beer specialists of the Schneider brewery are regularly awarded at international competitions.
This proves that they are justly considered as world classics. A unique variety of distinguishing wheat beer specialties is being brewed at Bavaria's oldest wheat beer brewery strictly following the Reinheitsgebot.
The brewer, Georg Schneider VI, presents his family of wheat beer specialties.
When describing wheat beer production one distinguishes between various stages of the process: mashing, lautering, boiling, cooling, fermentation and storage. Mashing begins with the crushing of the malt in a grain mill. After immediately adding heated water a so-called mash is produced in the mash tun. The selection of water temperature in itself is of importance to the subsequent quality of the beer because it activates the enzymes present in the malt which then act on its components. An important objective in doing so is to break down the existing starches into low molecular weight, fermentable sugars. This break down occurs in part mechanically through digestion and in part enzymatically. To this end a mash extract is withdrawn from the mash which is then slowly brought to the boil. This splits open the starch kernels and when the two partial mashes are subsequently recombined, the enzymes of the unboiled mash are able to act more rigorously on the released starch. This process can be repeated several times depending on the characteristics of the malt or the desired beer quality. Once starch breakdown is complete, the actual mashing process is finished. Sugar is added to the mash and it is then pumped to the so-called lautering tun.

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