Cocktail Glassware Guide

Chilled glasses are the best way to serve your cocktails. Glasses can be put in the refrigerator before serving, or another common way is to fill the glass with ice before preparing the drink, swishing the ice around then emptying the ice before pouring. Either way will work and will chill your glass.

Often a recipe calls for a glass that is frosted to enhance the drink. There are a couple of different ways to frost a glass depending on the recipe. These are very easy to do and just take a little time before the drink is to be made.

The most common frosted glass is simply put in the freezer or buried in ice cubes long enough to create a white frosted look on the glass. For drinks that call for a sugar frosting, take the frosted glass and wipe the rim with a slice of lemon or lime. After this, dip in powdered sugar to complete the effect. Margaritas are prepared the same, but the rim is coated with lime and dipped in coarse salt.

The traditional beer container.
Typical Size: 16 oz.
The shape of this glass concentrates the alcoholic odours to the top of the glass as your hands warm the brandy.
Typical Size: 17.5 oz.
This tulip shaped glass is designed to show off the waltzing bubbles of the wine as they brush against the side of the glass and spread out into a sparkling mousse.
Typical Size: 6 oz.
This glass has a triangle-bowl design with a long stem, and is used for a wide range of straight-up (without ice) cocktails, including martinis, Manhattans, metropolitans, and gimlets. Also known as a martini glass.
Typical Size: 4-12 oz.
The traditional mug used for hot coffee.
Typical Size: 12-16 oz.
Shaped similarly to a highball glass, only taller, the collins glass was originally used for the line of collins gin drinks, and is now also commonly used for soft drinks, alcoholic juice, and tropical/exotic juices such as Mai Tai's.
Typical Size: 14 oz.
Small and stemmed glasses used for serving small portions of your favourite liquors at times such as after a meal.
Typical Size: 2 oz.
A straight-sided glass, often an elegant way to serve many types of mixed drinks, like those served on the rocks, shots, and mixer combined liquor drinks (ie. gin and tonic).
Typical Size: 8-12 oz.
A tall, elegantly cut glass named after it's hurricane-lamp-like shape, used for exotic/tropical drinks.
Typical Size: 15 oz.
This slightly larger and rounded approach to a cocktail glass has a broad-rim for holding salt, ideal for margarita's. It is also used in daiquiris and other fruit drinks.
Typical Size: 12 oz.
These large square containers are effective in keeping their contents sealed in an air tight environment.
They're designed for home canning, being used for preserves and jam amongst other things.
Typical Size: 16 oz.
A short, round so called "rocks" glass, suitable for cocktails or liquor served on the rocks, or "with a splash".
Typical Size: 8-10 oz.
This glass has a similar inwards curve to that of a hurricane glass, with a steeper outwards rim and larger, rounded bowl. Often used for drinks containing fruit or ice cream.
Typical Size: 12 oz.
A narrow glass essentially used for pousse cafes and other layered dessert drinks. It's shape increases the ease of layering ingredients.
Typical Size: 6 oz.
A large hemispherical bowl suitable for punches or large mixes.
Typical Size: 1-5 gal.
A clear, thin, stemmed glass with a round bowl tapering inward at the rim.
Typical Size: 8 oz.
The preferred glass for aperitifs, ports, and sherry. The copita, with it's aroma enhancing narrow taper, is a type of sherry glass.
Typical Size: 2 oz.
A small glass suitable for vodka, whiskey and other liquors. Many "shot" mixed drinks also call for shot glasses.
Typical Size: 1.5 oz.
Also known as a delmonico glass, this is a stemmed, wide opening glass, alike to a small version of a champagne flute.
Typical Size: 5 oz.
A clear, thin, stemmed glass with an elongated oval bowl tapering inward at the rim.
Typical Size: 12.5 oz